When the Bear Comes Back Again

Henry Lawson, 1904

      Oh, the scene is wide an' dreary an' the sun is settin' red,
      An' the grey-black sky of winter's comin' closer overhead.
      Oh, the sun is settin' bloody with a blood-line on the snow,
      An' across it to the westward you can see old Bruin go;
             You can see old Shaggy go,
             You can see the brown Bear go,
      An' he's draggin' one leg arter, an' he's travellin' pretty slow.

      We can send a long shot arter, but he doesn't seem to know —
      There's a thin red line behind him where it's dripped across the snow;
      He is weary an' he's wounded, with his own blood he's half-blind,
      He is licked an' he's defeated, an' he's left some cubs behind;
             Yes, he's left some cubs behind;
             Oh, he's left some cubs behind;
      To the tune of sixty thousand he has left some cubs behind.

      Oh, they've pulled him by the nose-ring and they've baited him in pits,
      An' they bluffed him, an' they bruised him, an' they mostly gave him fits;
      But he hugged 'em badly one time when they tried him in his den —
      An' he'll make it warm for someone when he comes back East again;
             When the Bear comes back again,
             When he's lopin' round again,
      There'll be lively times for Jacko when the Bear comes back again.

      Oh, we chased him out of Turkey — I don't know for what idea,
      It took two dogs an' a lion for to beat him in Crimea;
      He's goin' home to lick his wounds, he's goin' to his den,
      But he'll make it warm for someone when he comes South-East again,
             When the Bear comes back again,
             When old Bruin comes again,
      He will make some dead to die on when he comes back from his den.

      Keep a sharp look-out behind you, every way you turn, my lad,
      It don't matter who you might be, for you bet the Bear is mad;
      Keep a sharp look-out to Nor'ard, to the South an' West an' East,
      For he mostly always finds you where you most expect him least;
             Where you most expect him leastest,
             Where you most expect him least,
      Oh, you'll catch him grabbin' for yer where you most expect him least.